December 21, 2011
thedailyfeed:

That’s Delmonico’s on Fifth Avenue at 44th Street, which opened in 1897 and entertained such famous diners as the Prince of Wales, who became King Edward VII. Today’s History Page takes you inside the luxe eatery, and how it brought French opulence to American food.

For two centuries, Americans who dined out had been doing so in taverns or inns. There they guzzled beer, paid a fixed price for whatever meat-and-two-veg fare was on offer, and sometimes engaged in raucous political debate. In the 1820s, however, new eating options emerged. Within Manhattan’s cramped business district, short-order joints known as “six-penny houses” — the fast-food spots of their day — bustled with lunchtime crowds, who devoured mediocre meals amid general pandemonium. Meanwhile, fancy hotels were offering an increasing variety of dishes, though they tended to serve them all up at once, compelling diners seated around communal tables to polish them off as fast as they could.
 The Delmonicos, by contrast, adopted Parisian customs. For the first time, as Lately Thomas writes in “Delmonico’s: A Century of Splendor,” “New Yorkers were able to order a luncheon or a dinner of their choice, select from a varied bill of fare, have it cooked to perfection and served at the hour they named, wash it down with a sound light wine, and pay a reasonable, set price.” Diners sat at their own tables, where they were treated to suave service and ate at a leisurely pace. This made Delmonico’s the first New York dining establishment worthy of being called a restaurant. (The French word had not yet entered common English usage.)

thedailyfeed:

That’s Delmonico’s on Fifth Avenue at 44th Street, which opened in 1897 and entertained such famous diners as the Prince of Wales, who became King Edward VII. Today’s History Page takes you inside the luxe eatery, and how it brought French opulence to American food.

For two centuries, Americans who dined out had been doing so in taverns or inns. There they guzzled beer, paid a fixed price for whatever meat-and-two-veg fare was on offer, and sometimes engaged in raucous political debate. In the 1820s, however, new eating options emerged. Within Manhattan’s cramped business district, short-order joints known as “six-penny houses” — the fast-food spots of their day — bustled with lunchtime crowds, who devoured mediocre meals amid general pandemonium. Meanwhile, fancy hotels were offering an increasing variety of dishes, though they tended to serve them all up at once, compelling diners seated around communal tables to polish them off as fast as they could.

 The Delmonicos, by contrast, adopted Parisian customs. For the first time, as Lately Thomas writes in “Delmonico’s: A Century of Splendor,” “New Yorkers were able to order a luncheon or a dinner of their choice, select from a varied bill of fare, have it cooked to perfection and served at the hour they named, wash it down with a sound light wine, and pay a reasonable, set price.” Diners sat at their own tables, where they were treated to suave service and ate at a leisurely pace. This made Delmonico’s the first New York dining establishment worthy of being called a restaurant. (The French word had not yet entered common English usage.)

(via thedailyfeed)

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Filed under: history food 
October 13, 2011
'Better For You' Foods May Be Better For Company Profits : The Salt : NPR

Processed foods that are low in calories, salt, fat or sugar are too expensive. And we won’t buy them if we think they won’t taste good — or so the conventional wisdom goes.

But a unique economics analysis published today says companies making foods that help keep us in shape can help keep them in shape, too. In fact, “better for you” products drove more than 70 percent of food company sales growth in the last five years, according to the analysis.

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Filed under: food economics 
October 2, 2011
Archaeological News: Food archaeologist gives new life to nearly extinct grains, veggies

archaeologicalnews:

PATAGONIA - Gary Nabhan has written stacks of research papers about culture, archaeology and food for academic journals, and has authored at least a dozen books, some meant for popular consumption, others the academic kind whose titles have colons and subtitles that are longer than the main title.

October 1, 2011

thedailyfeed:

Exclusive designer apples, tricky to breed but crispy to munch, are the latest in haute cuisine

“Like fine wines, there are apples that taste like anise, cherry, clove, banana. There are a lot of different flavors out there, but we’re trying to combine that with textures,” [Jim] Luby said. “There’s no perfect apple, yet.” 

 But he concedes that the Honeycrisp, the first big success of modern apple breeding, is pretty darn close. “For an eating experience, it’s great,” he said, “but it’s hard to grow.”

(via thedailyfeed)

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Filed under: Food News 
September 28, 2011
thedailyfeed:

The history of the ice cream cone!

The very first cone appeared [in the early 19th century]. One example can be seen in a French engraving published in 1807, in which a busty lady at a Parisian café hangs her mouth open before a precariously sideways ice cream cone.
But could she chew the cone? The owner of the print said that’s likely, although paper and metal cones were prevalent in France. Edible waffle cones were also popular in Dusseldorf, Germany, before the turn of the century, and English cookbooks from the middle of the 19th century give recipes for a custard-style ice cream served in delicate baked almond cornets.

thedailyfeed:

The history of the ice cream cone!

The very first cone appeared [in the early 19th century]. One example can be seen in a French engraving published in 1807, in which a busty lady at a Parisian café hangs her mouth open before a precariously sideways ice cream cone.

But could she chew the cone? The owner of the print said that’s likely, although paper and metal cones were prevalent in France. Edible waffle cones were also popular in Dusseldorf, Germany, before the turn of the century, and English cookbooks from the middle of the 19th century give recipes for a custard-style ice cream served in delicate baked almond cornets.

(Source: thedailyfeed)

September 26, 2011
that’s a big roll…

ever been to a sushi place and been dismayed by the small portions…

got the place for you…

A restaurant in Japan’s Aichi Prefecture has become famous for serving arguably the world’s largest sushi dishes, up to 20 cm in diameter and nearly 6-kg-heavy.

The Umewaka Restaurant in Anjo City, Japan is unlike any other sushi restaurant in the world. Here the world-renown Japanese delicacy doesn’t come in bite-size servings…

 At Umewaka, everything from the futomaki roll to the nigri zushi comes in super-sized servings no one man could hope to finish in one sitting.

more at  Oddity Central

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Filed under: sushi food 
May 1, 2011
you like roast beef, you like gum…well…

Neatorama

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Filed under: food funny 
January 25, 2011
more on milk

second in the series….

During the latter part of the 19th century, improvements were made in the quality of milk sold in the United States.


Neatorama

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Filed under: food 
January 25, 2011
match made in heaven?

reddit via boingboing

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Filed under: food 
January 14, 2011
the empire city's best restaurant?.... of all time?

try to define the best restaurants of the city so nice…they named it twice

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Filed under: Food History 
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